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Ask the Expert

It’s great that you have incorporated fruit and veggie activities into your teaching. With the change in the program from 5 A Day to Fruits & Veggies—More Matters®, we have updated our activities for children. There are some activities related to ‘Take your child to the supermarket’ day’ and P.A.C.K. week (September 22-26) in the ‘Get Kids Involved’ section of this site.  There are also activities in the kids section of the PBH website. On our kids website, www.foodchamps.org, there are activities that you may be able to adapt to be appropriate for fifth graders. There are also materials available in our online catalog that are very reasonably priced. 

 
 

Calcium fortified juices are good sources, and some vegetables including collard greens, spinach and dried peas and beans also provide significant amounts. You can check on the amount of calcium in many fruits and vegetables in our database here.

 

How many pieces of waffle you have depends on how many calories you need to eat. If you are trying to gain weight you may be able to eat more pieces than if you are trying to lose weight or stay at the same weight. Plum sauce is high in sugar, and we suggest only one serving of juice each day. Visit www.mypyramid.gov to plan a diet with the recommended amounts of each food group.

 
 

I suggest starting slowly with daily goals for including healthy foods. Goals to increase fruit and vegetable consumption might be a good place to start. For instance, you could set a goal to substitute a piece of fruit for high calorie snack foods, or a goal to include one more fruit or vegetable at a meal. The information in our Meal Planning section might help you get started. Good luck.

 

Please contact kruf@pbhfoundation.org.

 

A ½ cup serving of strawberries has 42.3 milligrams of Vitamin C; ½ cup of blueberries has 7.2 milligrams and 1 medium kiwi fruit has 70.5 milligrams. Our Fruit and Veggie Database will give you information about other nutrients in these foods.

 
 

When properly cooked, nutrient loss from fruits and vegetables is small. Overcooking will result in the most loss of nutrients. When they are prepared for freezing, the loss of nutrients is also very small. Commercially frozen fruits and vegetables are processed right after they have been picked, and the nutrient content is comparable to the fresh produce purchased in supermarkets. Broccoli that is fried will still have the same benefits, but it will also have a lot of extra calories. Click here to see the Top Ten Ways to Cook Fruits and Veggies.   

 
 
I am not familiar with this; perhaps the teacher will provide the link.
 
 
The aprons are only available for sale through our catalog.
 
 
We do not have that information at hand.
 
 
The Expert: Dr. Elizabeth Pivonka, a mother of two and a registered dietitian, shares years of experience in getting people to eat more fruits and veggies.
Read her full bio123 >>

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